• Apollo

A life lesson on curiosity and sincerity

I have a great but mysterious best friend named Pedro.


His two fantastic traits make me really jealous: he has a magical wanderlust which constantly leads him to discover new places and fascinating knowledge, and he somehow gets along with everyone he meets despite his personal shortcomings.


I'm very thankful to have a friend like him. He is that friend you are very grateful for and learn a lot from. Good conversations, fresh ideas, and genuine laughter. It all results in my personal improvement, too.


The fresh winds of change


Whenever we visit a new city, Pedro and I tend to explore its streets and suburbs with a desire to get to know the place like our hometown. I don’t understand where he gets it, but he has an undying thirst to chart the uncharted and to see what’s on the other side of every hill no matter where we are. He's always full of ideas, and through him I’ve learned to appreciate and feed my own curiosity and wanderlust through real-life exploration and by seeking to learn the unlearned.

What’s even more astonishing is that as Pedro gets older, you would expect him to get tired and settle down eventually. The exact opposite has happened. As the years go on, his interest in exploring the world only grows stronger as his curiosity is a central part of his identity. Every street corner, new stranger, and strange place.


This sense of discovery keeps him fresh, open, and friendly to new experiences and interesting characters. Curiosity is a fantastic trait that not only gets you further in every holiday destination but in life in general. With curiosity, you learn more about your studies and work, the fascinating individuals close to you and the mysterious world revolving around us. Curiosity is a severely underrated skill in self-improvement.

Getting along no matter the differences


His second trait is what I like the most about him, and it’s also what I really can't understand. He has a massive appreciation for himself, truly top-tier self-worth. It's like a combination of self-appreciation and moderate pride. Some people would call it a big ego, but Pedro is too friendly for that negative connotation.


First off, he’s a bit shorter than most, but it doesn’t shy him away from meeting new people. Wherever he goes, he meets the other party in the eyes, whether taller or shorter than him, and he treats them with equal respect without reservation. Some disagree with him and make fun of his height, but that doesn’t matter to him. He knows that in life you should appreciate and engage with the genuine people that appreciate you for what you are. Life is too short to be sulky about other people’s bad behavior.


There are a lot of mean people in this world. Some people value and rank you based on your appearance, and at worst based on your height. In a lot of cases, these are hollow people with bad values that you should not waste your time on.


Even then, don’t confuse respect with preference because you cannot control what people think of you. There will always be people who won’t like you and people who will love you. The good thing is that you’ve literally got millions if not billions of potential friends and in that big number there are numerous people who will appreciate and love you for exactly who you are. Respect your self-worth because you deserve to be appreciated for what you are and do and not what people expect you to be.


My friend's greatest mystery


Despite my praise, Pedro isn’t a robotically virtuous character. He's no prophet, because even he has his bad days, and when he does he is grumpy, tired and stressed out. But we're all like him, and we shouldn’t judge each other at our worst if we are friendly and kind for the most part.


There is one more thing you should know about Pedro. He isn’t just my ordinary best friend. In fact, he technically isn't my friend all.


Pedro is my 10-year-old pet chihuahua and he has taught me more about being a good person than a lot of people ever will.